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EMPIRE OF THE WHEEL

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Re: EMPIRE OF THE WHEEL

Postby WalterBosley » Tue Aug 02, 2011 11:33 am

As I've told Mike B, neither Rick nor I even venture into the territory of who Zodiac was. Personally, I think as the years pass, determining that gets closer to impossible, unfortunately. As for the issue with the ley lines, as I said on KSS, we're not asking people to believe in the concept of ley lines, we're saying the evidence in our case, and what I found with Zodiac, suggests the perp(s) may have believed in the concept. I have written about ley lines before EOW because the subject intrigues me and I think there is something to it. But I honestly approached investigating the San Bernardino Working(SBW) as an investigator, meaning keeping only the objective stuff in the book in the end. Rick and I agreed on that.

In my professional opinion, potential evidence is never background noise, in the analysis phase. You have to remember, neither Rick nor I consider ourselves Zodiac Killer case experts. Our book devotes merely one chapter to Zodiac and only to those things we think may associate it in theme to the SBW deaths. We stand by our inclusion of the chapter in the book, but it does not solve the case. It may be that it contributes to understanding further what Zodiac was doing. Maybe. I've learned, with investigations, that I don't have to agree with a perp's line of thinking, I only need to see the logic. It's their logic, not mine.

Regarding one or more Zodiac Killers, very good points. However, consider that the team concept could have had one guy at a time interacting with the victims. There could have been another guy executing other functions. But I don't know, I don't claim to know who, Rick and I merely suggest a possibility in the book. And we find the team concept sincerely reasonable -- but more so with the SBW deaths , to be sure. Again, neither we nor our book purports to know who Zodiac was. We don't even say we can identify individuals with the SBW case. What we are saying is isn't it interesting the similarities between SBW and the Zodiac case. Personally, we are of the mind that Zodiac's time in the Inland Empire exposed him to the SBW deaths, simply because he may have read the same articles we did. I mean, they are publicly available, after all. In the mid-early 60s, there indeed likely were people alive who remembered the SBW deaths. It's possible, but not certain. Either way, it's intriguing as hell, to us. Our 'ley line' guy is a lot more spooked out with what we present than Rick and I are, which amuses me. :grin:

Anyway, as I said, I don't try to figure out exactly who. You guys have spent a LOT more time investigating that than I ever have. My interest now is in whether it'll happen again soon, based on an aspect of the data associated with SBW. Our perps appear to have been venerating the goddess Hecate, whose name is associated with the number 100. Some of that veneration is related to the number 100, specifically in two 50s. As I said on KSS, we are approaching the 100th anniversary of SBW, in 2015, which is roughly -- I say roughly -- 50 years after the emergence of Zodiac. That's sort of intriguing to consider, in a creepy way. Is it possible someone will copycat Zodiac? Could Zodiac have been copycatting SBW? I don't know. If I were an active duty agent again, I would have to consider that possibility.

The one thing right now that I would throw out there is to consider the following places for any unsolved murders or missing persons during the 60s/70s/80s: Santa Barbara, Ventura, Anaheim, Santa Ana, Torrance, to name a few places.
Look for anything that might show evidence or suggestion that it's a Zodiac case. For me, his statement that there are 37 more victims intrigues me as much as who he was personally. :smile:

Thanks for letting me jump in and offer my two cents. If you get a chance, give EOW a read. Even if the Zodiac chapter doesn't convince you, the SBW case might be interesting.

:smile:

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Re: EMPIRE OF THE WHEEL

Postby Zsearcher » Tue Aug 02, 2011 12:03 pm

Not enough information for me to get interested Zodiacwise. Can you tell us a bit about these early crimes. Were they in any way similar to the Zodiac crimes?

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Re: EMPIRE OF THE WHEEL

Postby Pettibon Junction » Tue Aug 02, 2011 12:11 pm

"Regarding one or more Zodiac Killers, very good points. However, consider that the team concept could have had one guy at a time interacting with the victims. There could have been another guy executing other functions."

Praytell, what other functions are you referencing? There was only one guy seen at all of the crime scenes for which we have witnesses, and the handwriting he left behind matched the letters that the killer sent to the Chronicle. Since the only evidence we have in this case that isn't circumstantial are the crime scenes and the letters (which both point to a single perpetrator acting alone), what evidence do YOU have that suggests otherwise? Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof and the onus is on you to provide it.

Good luck with your book.

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Re: EMPIRE OF THE WHEEL

Postby WalterBosley » Tue Aug 02, 2011 1:27 pm

Pettibon Junction wrote:"Regarding one or more Zodiac Killers, very good points. However, consider that the team concept could have had one guy at a time interacting with the victims. There could have been another guy executing other functions."

Praytell, what other functions are you referencing? There was only one guy seen at all of the crime scenes for which we have witnesses, and the handwriting he left behind matched the letters that the killer sent to the Chronicle. Since the only evidence we have in this case that isn't circumstantial are the crime scenes and the letters (which both point to a single perpetrator acting alone), what evidence do YOU have that suggests otherwise? Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof and the onus is on you to provide it.

Good luck with your book.

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Re: EMPIRE OF THE WHEEL

Postby WalterBosley » Tue Aug 02, 2011 1:27 pm

Pettibon Junction wrote:"Regarding one or more Zodiac Killers, very good points. However, consider that the team concept could have had one guy at a time interacting with the victims. There could have been another guy executing other functions."

Praytell, what other functions are you referencing? There was only one guy seen at all of the crime scenes for which we have witnesses, and the handwriting he left behind matched the letters that the killer sent to the Chronicle. Since the only evidence we have in this case that isn't circumstantial are the crime scenes and the letters (which both point to a single perpetrator acting alone), what evidence do YOU have that suggests otherwise? Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof and the onus is on you to provide it.

Good luck with your book.


It's merely a suggestion. :smile:

As stated, I'm not in the business of trying to identify a perpetrator. You seem emotionally connected to the issue and I certainly don't mean to offend anyone. I'm not here to to argue as if in a court of law, this is a discussion forum. I merely suggest the possibility and I thought I stated why I suggest it, but if not I simply considered that since ALA, for example, matched some evidence but could not be nailed on the DNA, maybe someone else was involved with him, if he were involved? I would say you guys have argued this far more than I have, so you're likely more up on the concept than Rick or I. :smile:

Our book simply presents the possibility that Zodiac was into the ley line concept and maybe attacked/killed his victims in geographic association with this concept. I equate that with how interesting it might be if a killer was killing victims in place names that all start with 'Q', for example. That is, what could it possibly mean? What EOW says about Zodiac in no way steps on anyone's toes regarding the pursuit of who he was, or on anyone's pet theory. It simply suggests further illumination on details of the attacks.

Gosh, I'd hate to think what the reaction would be if we HAD attempted to identify a perp, LOL. Seriously, though, we're not another guy claiming Uncle Bob or Dad was The Zodiac Killer. All you need to say is, 'Walter, that multiple killer theory has been considered and eliminated for various reasons' and I'm good. :grin: Neither Rick nor I are claiming to be Zodiac experts, but one does not need to be to simply suggest a possibility, do they?... :wink:

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Re: EMPIRE OF THE WHEEL

Postby Zsearcher » Tue Aug 02, 2011 1:36 pm

You'll need to have a thick skin to discuss anything in the Zodiac research community. Most of us have heard every possible story surrounding this case and have seen our share of theories. You said you wrote an entire chapter on the Zodiac connection. Well what is the connection? Is it just the ley lines or is there something more to it? If it just that ley lines may line up with Zodiac crimes and that's it, you may get a less than rousing reception. If that is it, many cynical people may think you added the Zodiac into your book to attract attention to it and nothing else, which we have seen a hundred times literally. You have a forum here to tell us that you haven't done this. Please reply to this and my previous comment. Thanks.

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Re: EMPIRE OF THE WHEEL

Postby Pettibon Junction » Tue Aug 02, 2011 1:41 pm

WalterBosley wrote:
Pettibon Junction wrote:"Regarding one or more Zodiac Killers, very good points. However, consider that the team concept could have had one guy at a time interacting with the victims. There could have been another guy executing other functions."

Praytell, what other functions are you referencing? There was only one guy seen at all of the crime scenes for which we have witnesses, and the handwriting he left behind matched the letters that the killer sent to the Chronicle. Since the only evidence we have in this case that isn't circumstantial are the crime scenes and the letters (which both point to a single perpetrator acting alone), what evidence do YOU have that suggests otherwise? Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof and the onus is on you to provide it.

Good luck with your book.


It's merely a suggestion. :smile:

As stated, I'm not in the business of trying to identify a perpetrator. You seem emotionally connected to the issue and I certainly don't mean to offend anyone. I'm not here to to argue as if in a court of law, this is a discussion forum. I merely suggest the possibility and I thought I stated why I suggest it, but if not I simply considered that since ALA, for example, matched some evidence but could not be nailed on the DNA, maybe someone else was involved with him, if he were involved? I would say you guys have argued this far more than I have, so you're likely more up on the concept than Rick or I. :smile:

Our book simply presents the possibility that Zodiac was into the ley line concept and maybe attacked/killed his victims in geographic association with this concept. I equate that with how interesting it might be if a killer was killing victims in place names that all start with 'Q', for example. That is, what could it possibly mean? What EOW says about Zodiac in no way steps on anyone's toes regarding the pursuit of who he was, or on anyone's pet theory. It simply suggests further illumination on details of the attacks.

Gosh, I'd hate to think what the reaction would be if we HAD attempted to identify a perp, LOL. Seriously, though, we're not another guy claiming Uncle Bob or Dad was The Zodiac Killer. All you need to say is, 'Walter, that multiple killer theory has been considered and eliminated for various reasons' and I'm good. :grin: Neither Rick nor I are claiming to be Zodiac experts, but one does not need to be to simply suggest a possibility, do they?... :wink:


I don't think I'm betraying any emotion with my post. I'm simply giving you a summation of why I don't buy into the "team Z" theory and asking for some evidence for why you, apparently, do. I'm not sure throwing out the ley line conjecture is going to suffice, since most American New Age interest in that phenomenon didn't really take off until 1972, with the U.S. publication of John Mitchell's "The View Over Atlantis." As the only confirmed Zodiac crimes took place over a period of less than a year from December 1968 to October 1969, wouldn't you say my skepticism is justified?

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Re: EMPIRE OF THE WHEEL

Postby Pettibon Junction » Tue Aug 02, 2011 1:58 pm

...but if I do seem a little reactionary, I apologize. After following a decade of academic interest in signature pattern homicide, most of my goodwill for ethically-challenged ghouls who write exploitative and factually barren books and screenplays about very real unsolved crimes is all but evaporated. This isn't to say you're among their lot - I haven't read your work - but I maintain a healthy skepticism for extraordinary claims and simply ask that if you're going to suggest some radical new angle, you have to build a case and convince me. Nothing personal.

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Re: EMPIRE OF THE WHEEL

Postby WalterBosley » Tue Aug 02, 2011 2:06 pm

Nope, the chapter wasn't thrown in. I really did plot the Z attacks on the ley line map that I'd had for over a year.

Actually, in EOW we identify what people popularly term 'ley' energy and lines as being likely associated to telluric current, which has been known about and used in technology since the 1850s. Also, ley lines even in the New Age sense have been known as such since the 1920s with the published works of Alfred Watkins. The concepts of ley energy and telluric current have been known much longer than the terms applied to them. :smile:

If you'll notice my use of smiley faces, you'll see that my skin is thicker than it may appear. I've had experience in forums before this, so I know what to expect. I simply choose not to engage in discussions wherein I sense I'm being indicted, LOL. Why not a friendlier discourse?

You see, Rick and I are not approaching what we wrote about from the POV that we are trying to necessarily convince anyone of anything. We are presenting a possibility based upon analysis of details and facts. We're saying our theory is possible. Regarding the Zodiac chapter, the same thing. No one owns the Zodiac case, certainly, so we share our suggestion because it popped up in our research. Honestly, it popped up.

Again, I personally don't see where there's any harm in the idea that Zodiac might possibly maybe have been doing something with ley line theory. Is that idea really all that offensive? :smile:

Mike Butterfield invited me into this forum, and we agreed that it would be respectful -- both ways. I equate respectful with not going down the debate/argument road. I simply prefer not to discuss it that way. What I have to say about Zodiac is what I said on the show and in the book. There's really nothing more. Rick and I think maybe he did something associated with ley lines/telluric currents.

Come on guys, isn't this supposed to be somewhat enjoyable?? :smile:

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Re: EMPIRE OF THE WHEEL

Postby WalterBosley » Tue Aug 02, 2011 2:16 pm

PJ: Understood. No problem... :smile:

Here's the chapter text. is there a way I can insert the illustrations?:

COPYRIGHT WALTER BOSLEY AND RICHARD B SPENCE 2011
Chapter Twenty Three


“The past and the present and the future seemed to be mingled in one wild, chaotic, whirling dream from the mass of which thoughts and ideas seemed now and again to fly out unexpectedly on all sides as do sparks from hot iron under the hammer…”

-Bram Stoker, The Mystery of the Sea


The fruit doesn’t fall far from the tree, it is said.
If The San Bernardino Working deaths were something more than an isolated local incident, particularly if they were the work of a group, might they have associations to other killings linked by geomorphology yet separated by time?
From December of 1968 through the fall of the following year, the San Francisco Bay area (indeed, all of California) was terrorized by a serial killer who dubbed himself “The Zodiac.” The Zodiac Killer would ultimately claim 37 victims, while others have credited him with as many as 49. His documented toll is far smaller, but still frightening. During his murderous spree, he undisputedly attacked seven persons, killing five, and he was considered the prime suspect in at least two other prior attacks resulting in three slayings. One of these early two attacks was perpetrated in Riverside, California, very near the location of our mystery.
There is neither shortage of material nor theories about the Zodiac Killer case, and it is not our intention to rehash them or offer a solution to the identity of the killer. Nor are we going to insist that there was any direct connection between Zodiac and what we have termed The San Bernardino Working. Indeed, on the surface the cases would appear to have nothing in common. Our 1915 killer/killers were faceless and silent and, if our postulation holds water, the murderous deeds were not the work of one hand, but many. The Zodiac, on the other hand, was as publicly boastful and sneeringly arrogant as Jack the Ripper. Also like the Ripper, The Zodiac’s effusions may be considered occult in a general sense – which begins to hint at similarity with our case. His letters to the press taunted authorities and offered up arcane, coded clues to his methods and identity. Despite this, The Zodiac was never caught nor even definitively identified. In the end, he simply fell silent. When and if he stopped killing is another matter of debate.
Among the assorted clues The Zodiac left behind, there is one suggestive of at least a tangential link to our case. Basic credit for the discovery goes to writer Michael F. Cole who has developed two interesting theories about The Zodiac. Additionally, however, in 1980, researcher Gareth Penn made a significant discovery in the Zodiac Killer case (which has even landed him on some theorists’ suspect list). It was based on a statement from the killer that "The Mt. Diablo code concerns radians + # inches along the radians." Going on a map and other clues supplied by The Zodiac, Penn superimposed the killer’s “crosshairs” symbol on the peak of Mt. Diablo, a prominent geographic feature just east of San Francisco Bay. Extending the lines of the compass-like symbol, Penn found that an angle of approximately 1 radian (360/2π or ~ 57.296°) connected the Blue Rock Springs crime scene with the Stine murder scene.
Cole’s re-analysis of this discovery led him to conclude that the angle in question was not a radian, but a sixty-degree angle. Cole explains that degrees and radians are roughly equivalent but not equal units of measure. In other words, 360 degrees of a circle equals the 2 pi radians that also define the circle. They may each define the same area, but their individual measures are different. Cole argues that due to a miscalculation in the cryptography in the original translation of The Zodiac’s code, investigators thought he was telling them to apply his instruction in terms of a radian angle. However, doing so did not seem to produce any visible correlations. It seemed another false lead.
But Michael Cole is an engineer and familiar with radians. In his opinion, The Zodiac used the term to communicate to investigators that they should be thinking in terms of angles, but also, possibly to deliberately send them off in a wrong direction. The logic may not compute for some, but in the mind of a serial killer, the logic is his own. Armed with this idea, Cole took another look at the case and discovered something interesting.
He started with The Zodiac’s crosshairs logo:


It is basically a circle with a cross forming quadrants, or marking the cardinal points. The Zodiac’s moniker was Cole’s next clue. The word comes from the Greek for ‘circle of animals’. Our modern usage originates from the ring of constellations that the ancient Babylonians used to divide the ecliptic into twelve equal zones of celestial longitude. In Cole’s view, it wasn’t that the killer used the zodiac to select his victims by astrological signs, but rather as a tool to pre-determine the sites of his crimes. Cole then reasoned that The Zodiac applied a zodiacal wheel comprised of twelve sections of 30-degree-angles:


The map provided by The Zodiac instructed investigators to use an angle, setting the vertex point on Mt Diablo, and then stated that 0 (or the top point of the angle) should be set to Magnetic North, which is a 17-degree discrepancy to the east of True North:


Michael Cole’s Magnetic North model with 17 degree discrepancy

Following these instructions, Cole discovered that the sites of two Zodiac attacks were connected via Mt Diablo at a 60-degree angle. This, Cole believes, was the actual intention of The Zodiac’s original statement:
"The Mt. Diablo code concerns radians + # inches along the radians."
You could argue all day about why The Zodiac used the word radians, but it does not change the fact that degrees are what match his intent. Cole applied a zodiacal wheel to all the attack sites in the Bay Area – specifically the attacks associated with the killer during the time he identified himself personally as The Zodiac – and found that, using Mt Diablo as the center point, all but one of the victims connect via 60-degree angles. When Cole applied the zodiacal wheel theory to supposed victims outside the Bay Area, he found that the Riverside victim in the Inland Empire also fit the formula. While Cole admits that some of the attack sites vary slightly from the degree lines, he still believes that The Zodiac used them as a basic guide and that the connections are too close to be purely coincidental.

Michael Cole’s zodiac wheel model aligned 17 degrees to Magnetic North

The one Bay Area attack site that does not fit, according to Cole, is Lake Berryessa. However, Cole attributes this to The Zodiac having to extemporize, or, perhaps, it was a deliberate ploy to obscure the broader pattern. Then again, The Zodiac could have had another occult reason to pick Lake Berryessa.
Let’s take another look at all the sites of The Zodiac’s attacks. Four men and three women were attacked in the following: Vallejo, Blue Rock Springs Park; Benicia at Lake Herman Road; Napa at Lake Berryessa, and San Francisco in Presidio Heights. The murders attributed to The Zodiac prior to those in the Bay Area are a male and female killed at Gaviota State Beach near Santa Barbara, and a young woman brutally stabbed on the campus of Riverside City College. What else do they have in common?
In past chapters, we’ve noted the presence of planetary grid lines and curvilinear telluric currents at the locations of the 1915 murders/deaths.
One major intersection of several curvilinear leys or telluric currents sits in Glacier National Park on the Canadian border in Montana. From there, a major line curves southwest through Spokane, Washington, flowing on to Mt Shasta in northern California and continuing south towards San Francisco Bay. This telluric current leads right to the Zodiac attack sites in Vallejo and Napa. Splitting north of Napa, one branch of this telluric ley current curves round southwest toward the Bay. Along this line sits Lake Berryessa, site of the attack on 27 Sep 1969. The line continues across the bay and into the City, straight through to Presidio Heights, site of the murder on 11 October 1969. The second branch dividing north of Napa curves southeast through both Blue Rock Springs Park, site of the 4 July 1969 attack, and Lake Herman Road, site of the 20 December 1968 murders. Thus, all of the Bay Area Zodiac attacks took place along curvilinear ley lines of telluric current emanating from a common point.
Illustration 6: Telluric/ley current running through Zodiac Killer attack sites in the San Francisco Bay Area, as indicated by ‘1’, ‘2’ and ‘3’ for seven victims, only two of whom survived.

Does this suggest Mt Diablo is a telluric nexus? Perhaps so.
Furthermore, The Zodiac killed at least three other people before he cast his shadow over the Bay Area. His first presumed victims date back to 4 June 1963 when he killed the young man and woman, Robert Domingos and Linda Edwards, on a beach at Gaviota State Park, near Santa Barbara. Gaviota is even closer to Point Conception, site of that sacred humqaq of the Chumash. To no surprise, the area is intersected by another curvilinear line of telluric current which loops west from Los Angeles along the Santa Barbara coastline and out into the Pacific from the humqaq “spirit gate.”

Illustration 7: Telluric/Leys running through beach site of Zodiac Killer victims Robert Domingos and Linda Edwards at Gaviota State Park. The Chumash humqaq is at the point west of Gaviota Park. Note the telluric/ley runs also directly through the humqaq.




The Zodiac’s other claimed victim was Cheri Jo Bates, the girl murdered on 30 October 1966 in an alleyway off Terracina Road on the campus of Riverside City College (now Riverside Community College) just a few miles from San Bernardino. The site of Bates’ murder lay within the framework of several lines of telluric current, one of which flows from a previously identified intersection of lines at Disneyland, across two counties and into downtown Riverside. But it is a main planetary grid line, named ‘The Axis of Equilibrium’ by geomorphology consultant Sesh Heri, which is the key here. This axis passes directly along the giant Arrowhead’s length, its traced direction marking a telluric/ley line across the San Bernardino landscape, southeast to downtown Riverside -- specifically to a spot heavy with curvilinear and angled lines forming a very complex configuration of esoteric and telluric energy, according to Heri. The heart of that telluric/ley configuration in Riverside is the apex of an isosceles triangle, the long sides of which branch out accordingly.

Illustration 8: The isosceles triangle is at the Riverside end of this line

One of the lines branching off the isosceles triangle at the intersection of The Axis of Equilibrium and the center of the telluric ‘ley’ configuration in downtown Riverside passes directly through the location of The Zodiac Killer’s murder of Cheri Jo Bates on the Riverside Community College campus. Essentially, the Arrowhead points to the Bates murder site:


Illustration 9: Cheri Jo Bates was murdered by The Zodiac Killer in an alley between Terracina and Fairfax as they walked north to south. The telluric/ley line from the downtown Riverside configuration runs right through where the alley once existed, since constructed over.

Thus, every known and presumed victim of The Zodiac was attacked or killed on or nearly exactly relative to the telluric/ley currents, bar none.
Not only that, The Zodiac clearly had an association with Southern California, specifically the Inland Empire. One prime suspect, Arthur Leigh Allen, once resided in Riverside, and another was in Pomona at the time of the Riverside murder.
But aside from the telluric or ‘ley line’ connection, are there any other similarities between the Zodiac killings and our case?
The Zodiac attacked seven people in the Bay Area, four male and three female. In our theoretical “San Bernardino Working,” we also have seven victims -- four males and three females. That’s a start.
Interestingly, when one applies the “zodiac wheel” to The San Bernardino Working, the results are notable. Using the same method The Zodiac suggests in his letter and map, we aligned the 0 of our wheel to Magnetic North and placed the center of the wheel to the major nodal point intersection at Urbita Springs Lake.
0 aligned to the giant Arrowhead, indicating to us the Arrowhead’s approximate Magnetic North alignment.


Illustration 10: The giant Arrowhead is aligned approximately to Magnetic North. In one account, O.H. Bailey was found just eighty feet below the Arrowhead.
In fact, similar to the Zodiac Killer case, all seven of the deaths in The San Bernardino Working connect roughly at angles with a common denominator: 15. The victims in our mystery find connection to one another at 30, 45, 60 or 90-degree angles, when the center of the zodiacal wheel is placed at the Urbita Springs Park nodal point. We reiterate, as does Cole in his theory, that this rough association to the angles is close enough to suggest an attempt at alignment. In our mystery, the angles are all close enough to multiples of 15 – synchronistic to the year 1915, perhaps, i.e. the 15th year of the century – to suggest the inspired attempt of alignment found in the Zodiac Killer case. Did The Zodiac learn something about the theoretical process of ‘magickal’ victim placement that made him site his attacks at only his apparent preference of 60 degree angles? This, to us, is as significant as the giant Arrowhead being pretty near aligned to Magnetic North.






Illustration 11: Cole’s ‘Zodiac wheel’ laid over San Bernardino Working victim sites map.


We remind the reader that when dealing with homicidal psychopaths; their logic is their own and circumstances may have forced the killers to commit their acts in roughly aligned locations because being exact was not possible for reasons unanticipated or uncontrollable by the killer(s). Regardless of the flaws that may seem inherent, apparently close enough was good enough for the perpetrator(s) in both cases, in our estimation.
Is this association between the lines and the site of The Zodiac Killer murder sites merely coincidence? How about the ‘coincidence’ of the carousel? By Sesh Heri’s calculations, a major/straight planetary grid line that passes through Tilden Park just to the east of Berkeley, California, and the Bay. During the Zodiac killings, Tilden Park already owned the carousel in question. Remember, we have proven through our research that this was the very same carousel that spun merrymakers in Urbita Springs Park fifty years earlier, the year of our mystery. This carousel had been built by Herschell-Spillman for Urbita Springs Park in San Bernardino in 1911.
A carousel, of course, is essentially a rotating wheel, yet another manifestation of the wheels sacred to both St. Catherine and Hekate, the Chumash wheel petroglyphs, The Zodiac’s circular symbol and a nodal point of radiating telluric currents, one of which likely ran through the 1915 position of the carousel. Recall that the very definition of the word ‘zodiac’ means ‘circle of animals – a clear description of a carousel.
And what about the voodoo Damballah?
Consider the eerie familiarity between The Zodiac’s symbol tilted to magnetic North, but mostly the zodiac wheel in Cole’s theory tilted the equivalent 17 degrees and this depiction of the voodoo Damballah, an important element of which is also tilted to a roughly equivalent (if not exact) degree:

Illustration 12: Voodoo Damballah on left. Note that it’s a virtual twin of Cole’s ‘Zodiac Wheel’ and also approximately matches the tilt of The Zodiac Killer ‘target’ symbol and the giant Arrowhead of San Bernardino, both roughly aligned to magnetic north. (Line drawing from A Pictorial History of Magic and the Supernatural, edited by Maurice Bessy, Spring Books/Hamlyn 1964)

The Damballah represents the geometric perfection of the mysteries and has been linked by scholars to the Egyptian mysteries, which are linked to Hekate as demonstrated in the very name of Egyptian magic, Heka. In the center of a voodoo temple is a symbol of the rising sun represented by a vertical symbol surrounded by other symbols. Likewise in an Egyptian temple depicting a rising sun on the horizon also surrounded by the same symbols. The cult of St. Catherine is associated with the rising sun as well, bringing us full circle, pardon the pun. Even the heads of the snakes on the Damballah wheel extend beyond the circumference just as do the spokes of Catherine’s wheel. Were The Zodiac’s symbol and his murderous acts influenced by the voodoo Damballah and a synchronicity to our mystery unknown to him (or them)?
Or did The Zodiac know something about the 1915 deaths that was unexplored until now?
Coincidence, upon coincidence, upon coincidence. However, James Shelby Downard might argue that there was no coincidence at all, rather subtle indications of the occult connections between places, people and things.
Others have suggested, based on perceived certain patterns in his language and his apparent appreciation of Gilbert & Sullivan, that Zodiac was British or familiar with anglophile ways. And there is the British undercurrent in The San Bernardino Working, evidence by E. P. Braid, the Indian interlude of Mark Shaw, even the brief appearance of Aleister Crowley (not to mention the sinister Manby). The Zodiac evidently knew something about cryptography, from which some have deduced a military or intelligence association. Whatever their involvement in the Working itself, as we have shown, there were undoubtedly intelligence types moving through and around the Inland Empire in 1915.
The other startling similarity and possible link between The San Bernardino Working deaths and the Zodiac Killer murders is an undercurrent of the occult. Allegations of occult involvement in the Zodiac case have circulated for years, including one anonymous letter claiming that he was nothing less than a follower of Aleister Crowley (perhaps one more bit of lore used to slander the mage by association in the years since his death). It is likely that Crowley would have had as low opinion of The Zodiac as he did charlatan Spiritualists of his own lifetime. Moving on, we see in his letters that The Zodiac admitted that his basic aim in the killings was to collect “slaves”—souls—to serve him in the afterlife. He also had an evident grasp on astrology, and based on what we’ve laid out above, ley energy as well. The latter, of course, also seems to have been of vital, importance to the perpetrators of the 1915 crimes.
As in the 1915 crimes, the occult angle also raises the possibility that The Zodiac was not, as generally assumed, a lone wolf killer, but part of a group or someone acting on a group’s instructions. Thus, investigators may have failed to solve the case in part because they were chasing after a solitary man who didn’t exist. Was the person who wrote The Zodiac’s letters the same one who carried out the killings? And was the killer in each case truly identical? Such a scenario reduces the Zodiac Killer to a Downardian phantasm created and manipulated by unseen hands for their own arcane purposes. This may be why Arthur Leigh Allen could never actually be pinned, because the evidence was spread across a team of killers.
Of course, that’s basically what we have postulated was going on some fifty years earlier in San Bernardino.
It seems extremely unlikely that The Zodiac himself could have had any direct association with the 1915 events, as intriguing as that possibility might be. Assuming that he was a mere twenty year old in that year, he would have been seventy-three in 1968, a bit long in the tooth to have carried out all of The Zodiac’s known exploits. But groups live much longer than men and renew themselves with fresh blood, both literal and figurative. We have suggested that the killer/killers behind all or most of the 1915 deaths were not an isolated phenomenon, but possibly and disturbingly linked to a sleeper cell of occult motivated agents in California and further afield. ‘The Zodiac’, individually or collectively, could have been a manifestation of the same group, or its revival. The difference in style, i.e. the disguised nature of the 1915 killings versus the “in-your-face” attitude of The Zodiac, could as much have been a reflection of the differing attitudes of the times as anything else. Among his statements of a supposed 37 victims, The Zodiac claimed that there were several yet to be discovered in Southern California. He also claimed that he had made several of the killings look like accidents or something other than murder.
Suicides, perhaps?
Could one of the San Bernardino Working killers have been one among a team of Zodiac Killers?
We find the synchronicities to our mystery too intriguing to ignore, but the reader may still disagree.
Consider this additional point: Toyne Newton, in his book The Dark Worship, cites that the ancient Greeks associated the number 100 with ‘Hecate’, and to take it further they also associated ‘Hecate’ as a ‘great year’ of twice fifty months. The Dogon tribe of Africa described the fifty year orbital cycle of Sirius by counting it twice, thus equaling 100 years. Is it not interesting that The Zodiac arrives on the scene almost exactly 50 years after our mystery?
The murders of Robert Domingos and Linda Edwards at Gaviota Beach Park in 1963, and in 1966 the Cheri Jo Bates’ murder in Riverside (the ‘sister city’ you might say of San Bernardino). With his claims of many more bodies not found, we cannot be certain The Zodiac did not kill anyone in 1965, a more exact match in the fifty-year cycle consideration. We simply must put it on the table with everything else because 48 years is pretty close when dealing with a psychotic mind. Why not 38 years? Why not 62? This proximity to 50 years may ultimately be dismissed, but it cannot be ignored.
Perhaps what is most disturbing about this possibility of a fifty year cycle is that we are coming up on the 100th anniversary of the deaths of 1915, fifty years after the emergence of The Zodiac.
Of course, the Zodiac Killer case was only one episode in a history of occult-laced crime in the Golden State, a history of which we argue The San Bernardino Working is a heretofore unknown chapter. A little more than a decade after our San Bernardino Working deaths, horror struck the nearby community of Wineville when local resident Gordon Northcott, abetted by other members of his family, abducted, tortured and murdered at least four young boys, possibly many more. Whether Northcott acted solely on his own twisted desire, or partly at the instigation of shadowy others (based upon his own statements), remains one of the many puzzles in the case. Consider that Wineville, since renamed to Mira Loma, is merely ‘over the hill’ (Mt Rubidoux) west of Riverside and the telluric/ley configuration connected to the The Zodiac murder site of Cheri Jo Bates.
In the immediate wake of the Zodiac killings, northern California authorities arrested one Stanley Dean Baker, who not only subsequently confessed to being a cannibal, but also a member of a “satanic cult” dubbed the “Four Pi.” At its head, allegedly, sat a sinister—and well-connected--figure known only as the “Grand Chingon,” and its dark tentacles extended throughout California and the West. Writers such as Ed Saunders, author of “The Family”, Maury Terry author of “The Ultimate Evil” and more recently by Adam Gorightly in his excellent and exhaustive book “The Shadow over Santa Susana”, have in turn uncovered possible ties with that group to Charles Manson and his homicidal followers as well as the “Son of Sam” murders which terrorized the New York area in the 1970s. Let’s not overlook the more recent 1980s drug lord Adolfo Constanzo, a former tarot card reader and murderous leader of the Matomoros Cult that sacrificed victims in the belief they would draw power from their souls. As a teenager, Constanzo had reportedly learned the drug trade from a Palo Mayombe voodoo priest (Remember the Damballah Wheel…?).
We suggest it is sufficiently significant that themes of occult driven homicide with the goal of power over the elements, natural and supernatural, are prevalent enough in the past century that it bears mention here. We argue that the Zodiac killings share with our San Bernardino mystery too many similarities of a specific nature to be dismissed. Admittedly, while we have detected some pattern, we still as yet cannot completely identify it.
While we have considered the single killer option -- the startling and highly improbable possibility that The Zodiac Killer himself could have been alive and able to commit The San Bernardino Working murders -- it is intriguingly more likely that he might have learned of the killings of 1915 and attempted to emulate them or was part of a team of killers (thus accounting for the range of ages applied to the killer by witnesses). A darker possibility is that The Zodiac was told of The San Bernardino Working and carried out the murders at the behest of an occult group possibly descended from that which carried it out that autumn roughly fifty years prior, the halfway point of the Hecate/Hekate measure of 100 years. Will another killer or group of killers take up the torch, as did Hekate herself, and venture into a psychological subterranea of homicidal madness in veneration of the coming centennial of The San Bernardino Working?
If nothing else, we suggest the authorities may determine if The Zodiac’s claim of many unfound victims in Southern California is valid by looking for clues, if not physical evidence, along the telluric ley currents. Unsolved cases from the killer’s era that link to these lines could possibly reveal The Zodiac’s guilty hand and give closure to families and friends. It’s worth a try.
Some may insist that such tales of cult involvement are nothing but the rants of madmen and the overactive imaginations of writers. Others more knowledgeable argue that they are genuine manifestations of a dark underground reality, the existence of which most of us would rather not confront nor fathom.
What did Chief Walter Shay ultimately conclude?
We may never know.

COPYRIGHT WALTER BOSLEY AND RICHARD B SPENCE 2011

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